OFFICERS PLEASE NOTE – GENERAL MONTGOMERY SPEAKS TO MEN OF THE EIGHTH ARMY

From YANK Magazine

Before the British Eighth Army moved on El Alamein and routed Rommel’s Afrika Korps, Montgomery called his staff officers together for a conference. He outlined his plan of battle. He explained where he was going, and why, and how to get there. It was a standard General Staff huddle, open only to the higher brass.



But Montgomery didn’t stop there. He ordered the battle plan explained to every man of the command, right down to the last buck private.

Inspired by the confidence their commander had placed in them by letting them in on the whole secret of the campaign, Gen. Montgomery’s men went out and chased Rommel clear off the desert.

Thus was rewarded a general’s faith that enlisted men are intelligent enough to be trusted with a broad plan of battle. In effect the general said, “We are all in this together. Here’s what we’re going to do; let’s go.” As a result, every soldier was able to make his own individual effort in relation to the whole strategy.

We’ll bet a hat that the Eighth Army is a better outfit today for having shared, each man equally, in the campaign. We’ll also bet the Eighth Army has such confidence in its command that in history it will be recorded as one of the greatest armies of this war.

Smart general, that Montgomery.



general montgomery eighth army north africa

Field Marshal Bernard Law Montgomery in North Africa. Montgomery commanded the Eighth Army in Tunisia, Sicily and Italy and the 21st Army Group in North West Europe.



For More on General Montgomery Check Out:

The Memoirs of Field Marshal Montgomery


Patton, Montgomery, Rommel: Masters of War




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One thought on “OFFICERS PLEASE NOTE – GENERAL MONTGOMERY SPEAKS TO MEN OF THE EIGHTH ARMY

  • Bill Getz says:

    As I recall, and my memory may be faulty, General Montgomery and General Eisenhower did not see eye-to-eye on strategy for the invasion and following. Montgomery had a reputation (as heard in my lowly position) as rather an arrogant fellow. He failed in his leadership of forces through Northeast France and Belgium resulting in the Battle of the Bulge. General Patton was diverted to rescue Montgomery’s forces, which consisted of British, American, and forces from other Allies. As I said, this is the memory by a 93 year old and may not be reliable.

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