WAR HINGES ON BATTLE AT RHINE—REPORTS GEN. EISENHOWER

Posted on November 17th, 2016 by:

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WAR HINGES ON BATTLE AT RHINE—REPORTS GEN. EISENHOWER

By Jules B. Grad

Stars and Stripes Staff Writer

From the November 22, 1944 Edition of Stars and Stripes.

eisenhower

General Dwight D. Eisenhower

The Battle of Germany is likely to be fought out west of the Rhine—where the Ruhr is threatened, Gen. Eisenhower disclosed yesterday in his first press conference since a whirlwind tour of the fighting fronts.

He said he saw no signs that the Germans were retreating across the Rhine east of Aachen. With a large force committed west of such a great natural barrier as the Rhine against an army whose massive aerial superiority has power to blast retreat bridges, the Germans, he said, had no alternative but to stand and fight.

Reviewing the war situation as he found it along miles of the Western Front, Gen. Eisenhower also declared that supplies were needed in greater amounts than ever before.



Blueprint for Future

“I want more supplies than we’re getting, and I think the soldier wants more than he’s getting—both now and in the future,” he said.

In disclosing his blueprint for future operations—to increase pressure steadily all along the Western Front until the Germans are crushed—the general warned against a growing sense of complacency on the home front. He said he could not conceive that anyone at home would say that American troops should take more losses and do less work.

“Unless everyone—those at the front and those at home—keep on the job everlastingly and with mounting intensity, we are only postponing the day of victory,” Gen. Eisenhower said. “The very maximum effort must be made on the day of surrender.”

He emphasized that he did not intend to criticize the home front, but simply wanted the men on the war fronts to have everything possible to quicken victory for the sake of both the doughboys in the foxholes and their relatives at home.

There has been no visible sign of a crack in German morale, he said, but explained that his troops were taking the traditional avenues of invasion—Belfort, Metz, and Aachen, and were using these areas to smash further into Germany.

He again underlined the excellent teamwork between ground, sea and air forces and said Allied planes would continue to bomb Germany.



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