ALLIED SAILORS INDULGE IN WINTER SPORTS IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC

The Battle of the Atlantic was the longest military campaign of World War II. It lasted from September 3, 1941 until Germany’s surrender on May 8, 1945.

A battle was a supply war to keep the life-line of Allied merchant shipping open from North America to Britain and the Soviet Union.

Because the Treaty of Versailles limited the number of surface warships the Kreigsmarine (German Navy) was allowed, Germany focused its efforts on building submarines. By the start of WWII, the Kreigsmarine had the largest submarine fleet in the world.  These U-boats wreaked havoc on Allied merchant shipping from mid-1940 until 1943, when effective Allied anti-submarine countermeasures were introduced.

The Battle of the Atlantic was an Allied victory but came at a heavy price. 3,500 Allied merchant ships and 175 warships were sunk by the Kreigsmarine, for the loss of 783 U-boats.



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One thought on “ALLIED SAILORS INDULGE IN WINTER SPORTS IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC

  • Peter Kubicek says:

    Nice to see Allied sailors attempting to ski in whatever clumsy way they could. I did not know about such light-hearted interludes during this dreadful war, particularly since I spent the last eight months of the War in German concentration camps. When I was finally liberated on May 2, 1945, I was more dead than alive. After a couple of years of recuperation and after regaining my strength, I ultimately became a passionate skier. I skied at least once a year, both in the U.S. and all over Europe. The last time I skied was in 2007: in January in Vail, Colorado and in February in Grindelwald, Switzerland.

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